Covid creativity Italian style

An impromptu blog post as I only discovered this amazing project yesterday and wanted to share it with you all. Besides you may want to contribute to it as it is a crowdfunding project on Kickstarter.com – Just5 self sanitizing Jacket Can you believe it?

Just5 jacket

Photo credit: Kickstarter.com Just5Jacket

In such stressful times as Covid 19 people are working behind the scenes to come up with solutions that will help contribute to our future safety. A strategic mix of Swiss technology with Italian style and design. I am so enthusiastic about it, as if you read all the info it is certainly catering to my line of thinking environmentally and ethically. And there is even a good Aussie contribution to its development!

To stimulate your curiosity I will give you some details taken from the kickstarter.com website but best to see their videos on site which explain it better.

“All the components of JUST5 jacket – Fabrics, Sewing Threads and even the Zippers – are 100% self-sanitizing thanks to the world’s most advanced hygiene preserving  technology for textiles: HeiQ V-Block.

Any surface we touch and any garment we wear can be dirty or contaminated by contaminants floating around in the air. The JUST5 jacket will keep you sheltered from your surroundings and safe when touching outside surfaces on the go. Its hygienic surface is restored within just 5 minutes so that it stays usable forever.

Just5 Strategic Partners

Photo credit: Kickerstarter.com Just5 Jacket

JUST5 is like a multi-functional isolation gown, just more fashionable and full of practical features. It is an initiative by 5 leading material manufacturers and features 5 life-enhancing gadgets.

Made from “Sustainable materials                                                                    All the synthetic parts will be made of Recycled polymers. Specifically all the polyester parts will be made of REPREVE-UNIFI from post-consumer recycled bottles. The Nylon parts will be made of ECONYL from post-consumer recycled fishing nets and carpet fluff and also REPREVE-UNIFI post industrial recycled fabric scraps.”

Environmentally friendly factories

All the factories involved will have to be BSCI compliant .( ie respecting Universal and ethical working conditions) All the fabrics will have to be Blue Sign and OEKOTEX compliant (ie textile products with the least possible environmental impact, offering greater safety to workers and consumers)

Take a look at the HEIQ Scientific board members

HEIQ Scientific board

HEIQ Scientific board Photo credit: Kickstarter.com Just5 Jacket

 

and hear on the video that the material “has been tested and verified by the Doherty Institute of Melbourne, Australia’s leader in contaminated micro elements studies”

The Kickstarter crowdfunding project continues until Oct 5 so think about it. I am looking forward to being wrapped in carpet fluff, tied up with fishing nets and rolled in plastic bottles in my new Just5 jacket.!

What can I say….Italians do it better!?!

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The Botany of Leonardo da Vinci

Santa Maria Novella church, Florence

It seems appropriate to finish the year with a post on Leonardo Da Vinci since we have been commemorating 500th anniversary of his death with all sorts of events. Besides it’s fascinating to learn more about his genius as a Scientist, Botanist, Biologist and more; his holistic approach and prolific notes and designs crammed onto every page of the Codes.

This time the exhibition – The Botany of Leonardo  focused on ‘the philosophical and technical content of the time in which Leonardo Da Vinci lived in order to explore his study of the forms and Leonardo Atlanticus codeprocesses of the plant world in greater depth, through his outlook as a “systemic” thinker, highlighting the connections between art, science and nature’ ( Exhibition Notes). 

I was fortunate to be taken through the exhibition with a guide who added a little more spice in the introduction to Leonardo sharing details essential to understanding his scribblings since he was left handed and wrote from right to left. At that time left Leonardo's left handed scripthandedness was considered the devil’s hand and children were punished severely. Leonardo instead had been rather pampered by his paternal grandfather who indulges his left handedness and encourages his studies with a private teacher so he never comes under the stricter teachings of the classics and humanities. As a child born out of wedlock, the freedom allowed in his grandfather’s care means he is spared from the dogmas of the time developing a ‘freethinking attitude full of experience and experiment that foreshadows the scientific methods developed more than a century later by Bacon and Galileo.’  (Walter Isaacson “Leonardo da Vinci”). Examples of Leonardo’s writing are only easily read in a mirror reflection.

Model of furnaces used for chemical and pharmaceutical productionThe guide continued to emphasize Leonardo‘s respect of Nature as he experimented with alchemical processes, studying the cause and effect, and despising anyone who tried to replace Nature and break its laws, manipulating it for their own end. Two model furnaces were on display from St Mark’s Foundry similar to what Leonardo designed having recognized the power of fire in transforming materials, in particular metals.

The Refactory housed the main exhibits and we are welcomed immediately by a live plant wall with a projected ceiling decoration of Leonardo‘s from the Sforza

Castle in Milan where he had spent many years in the service of Ludovico il Moro. His codes cover extensive scientific studies on light, perspective, urban planning and architecture, engineering, mechanics, human and animal anatomy, an endless search to understand the complexities of his surroundings with an interdisciplinary perspective.

He sees similarities between processes, structures and patterns e.g. his study of the human body and blood circulation is compared to the vital sap that nourishes trees, or tributary branches of a river.

Building on ancient Roman theories Leonardo discovered the principles of what we nowPhyllotactic tower call phyllotaxis – the set of rules governing the arrangement of leaves along a branch, explaining how this arrangement helps the plant to receive air, light and water. Used in green architecture today.

He understands that plants respond to environmental stimuli, growing towards the light and the extent to which they are effected by gravity. Plants on a slowly turning wheel had been planted at various angles and only those upright were doing well, and those upside down were in a very sorry state.

And of course Leonardo, the artist, wrote endless recipes on preparing pigments, dyes and oils from the plant world for paintings and drawings.Leonardo's plants in The Annunciation

His meticulous studies being reproduced in his paintings and drawings of plants.

 

 

 

da Vinci's vitruvian treeThe exhibition was truly fascinating with so much more than can be described here. And catering to today’s world, ended with an invite to do a ‘Selfie‘ inside the ‘Vitruvian Tree’  one of Leonardo da Vinci‘s most famous drawings – ‘focusing on the measured relationships of the natural world, in search of the divine proportion between man and the living system’ ( exhibition notes). An invite to place ourselves within the regular forms of geometry and the equally perfect forms of Nature.Leonardo's vitruvian man

 

 

 

The man was a genius. His attention to detail is incredible, with such an advanced scientific approach that makes me think we are moving backwards while he was way ahead of us!


 

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Da Vinci’s CodeX in Florence

Florence at the time of Da VinciThe sound of water flowing, amid digital images of Florence at the time of Leonard da Vinci welcome visitors into the stimulating exhibition of Da Vinci, The Scientist – ‘Water as Microscope of Nature’ The exhibition is a temporary one in the Uffizi Gallery  till the end of January 2019, and one not to be missed.Leonardo da Vinci studies the manuscripts of san Marco convent

The exhibition displays original pages of Da Vinci’s Codex Leicester written between 1504-1508 focusing on water – “investigating its elementary structure, vortex movements, and mechanical and optical properties, as well as the technical solutions for exploiting it to the benefit of humanity…….exploring the analogies between water and air, and between the movements of fish and birds.” (Info at Exhibition)

Scribbled in Da Vinci’s unmistakable left handed scrawl from right to left, that exudes an intensity of concentration and precision. Meticulous designs of water flows, rock stratifications, light reflections, birds in flight and more.  Precise drawings of machines – Da Vinci's invention to dig canalsan odometer to measure distance, a centrifugal pump for draining marshes, underwater foundations for bridges and weirs, solutions to regulate the quantity and velocity of water drawn from siphons,  riverside constructions to combat erosion….the list was endless and fascinating.

He takes the human body as the model for elucidation of the physiology and dynamics of water and blood observationsthe Earth…. he speculates on the dynamic balance of the earth’s gravity….and offers practical advice to seamen from his understanding of hydrodynamics’

The digital presentations of his various machinery are mesmerising in their originality and creativity, providing us with the basis of many modern machines. He was interested in, and obsessively drew, the bit by bit analysis of every moving part in the machine and its contribution to the transfer of motion. The man was a true genius!

He invented a centrifugal pump for draining marshes, a man-saving device for digging canals, studied bird flight and wind currents to create our precursor to flight machines….

His theatrical mechanisms for court pageants, ‘allowing actors to rise and descend and float as if they were flying’ (Walter Isaacson) and from his studies of physics he truly believed that it was possible to build a winged mechanism that would allow humans to fly.

He was known to always carry notebooks which hung from his belt, constantly collecting ideas and scribbling observations of his surroundings from a technical, scientific and artistic point of view. His notes were transferred to the various manuscripts – Codex – of which more than 7200 pages exist today, considered to be only one-quarter of what Leonardo actually wrote, and which he had intended to publishing. “The most astonishing testament to the powers of human observation and imagination ever set down on paper” (Toby Lester “Da Vinci’s Ghost”)

Da Vinci's studies influence his artHis paintings elicit his geological theories on rock stratification as seen in the background of the Mona Lisa, and his studies of the impact of solar rays on the tint of the sky or secondary light he uses on the cheeks of Ginevra de Benci and The Virgin.

Leonardo was known to be slow and methodical in his artistic life, leaving many works of art, as well as machines and instruments unfinished or never started beyond a few draft etchings in his notebooks. After all, he took 16 years to finish the Mona Lisa, carrying it with him on his travels outside of Florence and Italy, constantly adding finishing touches!

Uffizi proudly displays another masterpiece, his unfinished, ‘Adoration of the Magi’ 1481-1482

Da Vinci Adoration of the Magi

Having just finished reading Walter Isaccson‘s biography on “Leonardo Da Vinci” the exhibition was in perfect timing to explore more and see the real documents of the Codex Leicester. An exhilarating experience and a super presentation of the Scientific mind and genius of Leonardo da Vinci.


 

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