Revolutija in Bologna

Exhibition 'RevolutijaA day in Bologna to see masterpieces never before exhibited outside of the Russian State Museum of St Petersburg on the centenary of the Russian revolution . Entitled Revolutija‘  – it relates those tumultuous days through the eyes of famous artists such as Kandinsky, Malevich, Chagall, and stars of the avant-garde….displaying the extraordinary modernity of the cultural movements of Russia at that time from Primitivism to Cubo-Futurism up to Suprematism, Expressionism and pure abstract art’ Wow!

We were just in time as the exhibition closed on the weekend, and was definitely not to be missed! Information boards recounted Russian history and important events leading up to the Revolutions of 1905 and 1917 and photographs, old film footage highlighted the harsh reality of the period. It was rich with atmosphere and drama, strengths and fragilities, joy and sadness. An overwhelming mix of superb works of art.

Such a plethora of information on the audio guide that I needed to circle the exhibition more than once to have time and head space to just savour the artworks and let them do their own talking as well as watch the old film screening. Political and social unrest Massacre at July Demonstration 1917with workers striking about their dismal conditions, peasants protesting about their miserable earnings, student unrest, and reactions against the Tsar and the repressive measures that occurred during demonstrations often ending in massacres. Disturbing and turbulent times indeed.

I instantly fell in love with Malevich, a new artist discovery for me, as I could not take my eyes of his beautiful symbolic geometric representations, intriguing secrets hidden in the abstractness, evoking compassion, making statements, strong and bold. But then I am passionate about futurist painters which Malevich was initially a part and later became the father of  ‘Suprematism – the belief that Suprematist art would be superior to all art of the past, and that it would lead to the supremacy of pure feeling or perception in the pictorial arts…. a search for the ‘zero degree’ of painting, the point beyond which the medium could not go without ceasing to be art.’  His famous paintings of bold black squares, circles or crosses on white became the symbol of his ‘zero degree’ art.

From strong and bold to the delicate and rather joyful depiction of Chagall in a self 'The Stroll' Marc Chagall 1917portrait with his wife Bella, and ‘the colourful even fun ‘On White’ by Wassily Kandinsky. 'On White' Kandinsky 1920

 

 

 

 

 

The exhibition ends with a celebration of the International Communist Party congress in 1920 alongside various artists work on the industrial period of the late 1920’s rendering tribute to the workers, ‘the heroes’, in the factories.

So much to take in and complemented by a comprehensive catalogue, that I could not resist, containing even more photos of the period and historic details of the harsh conditions and the creativeness of local artists, not always in line with the political regimes. So if I never get to Russia at least I have seen some of the splendid treasures they house at their State Museum.

Of course after feeding the intellect it was time to feed the stomach….and Bologna‘s famous tortellini spilled out of every corner alongside chunks of well matured Parmesan cheese. Tempting delicacies for everyone’s taste buds.Tortellini e Parmesan Bologna

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From under the Ashes of Pompeii

I have been lucky enough to visit Pompeii about 10 times and each time has fascinated me as much as my first visit, discovering something new every time. Buried under the ash erupting from Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD it provides us with amazing details of  Archaeological Museum Napleseveryday life and customs of the ancient world. Many of you may have been with me as we toured the massive Archaeological site with a guide. I regret now never having squeezed in a visit to the National Archaeological Museum of Naples as it has the most fabulous collection of Mosaics, Frescoes and artefacts from Pompeii and nearby Herculaneum. But then it’s not always possible to do everything on tours.

For those of you who have never been to Pompeii or to refresh your memory this video will walk you through this incredible Archaeological site – the Forum, Villas and bath houses. And to think there is at least a third of the city still to be excavated!

I spent a morning in the Archaeological Museum spellbound by the quantity and quality of the collection. Intricate mosaics discovered in the first excavation of Pompeii begun in 1749, a glorious mix of everyday life, exotic animals and theatrical scenes.

 

These are but a few that were on display together with an assortment of frescoes takenFrescoes Pompeii from various Villas in Pompeii, saved for eternity from deterioration on site. Cupids and ladies dancing to the seasons and many with the famous Pompeii red featuring as background to mythological figures. Entire rooms covered with elaborate frescoes demonstrating the wealth of the villa owners,  a true feast for the eyes.

And then special rooms dedicated to the erotic side of Pompeii where a school group was huddled embarrassed, giggling and quickly snapping a shot with their smartphones. I wondered if they had read why the phallic symbol was such a part of life then as ‘the male organ was regarded as a talisman of fecundity and prosperity which could also ward off evil influences’. So it was found everywhere; on walls, pavement stones, in front of shops and at home.

And for those families wealthy enough there was an entire range of tableware to keep Pompeii erotic tablewareguests entertained ‘providing an instance of the close association between eros and banqueting…..in crass burlesque spirit’ .

But these were not the only sassy artefacts on display as I came across my old game of  knuckles. Who could believe they were playing knuckles in the 1stC and I was still playing the same game in the 1960’s! (Not sure if it has turned into an App these days?!) And ancient dice and gladiators passes to enter the Arena. Unbelievable!

The sophistication of the articles on display was mindboggling considering their age. From the highly decorated kitchen utensils, jewellery boxes, modern alabaster and crystal vases to glass funerary urns dating between 3rd-5thC AD. It was stunningly overwhelming.

The elegance of the jewellery box with its bronze mirror, needle, silver jewellery gold plated, delicate bone comb and mermaid decorations….and the beauty of the cameo glass amphora with cupids grape harvesting left me speechless.

And to end the tour at Villa Papyri of Ancient Herculaneum where the owner could delight his guests lounging around the pool with a selection of glamorous statues.

And while this beautiful collection remains safely protected inside the Naples Archaeological Museum it is even more awesome to see what remains on site at Pompeii. The frescoes we found at the Villa of Mysteries in 2012 bowled us all over!

While my photos hardly do justice to the collection and cover a small portion of what is to be seen I can only suggest next time you are over to visit Pompeii, Herculaneum and the Naples Archaeological Museum.

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Treasures from the Unbelievable Wreck – Damien Hirst

Welcome back! I hope 2018 has begun well for you all. I start my posts this year with an exhibition from last year, but one not to be missed if it travels your way…

Damien Hirst Demon with bowlDamien Hirst had me believing in the unbelievable at his exhibition in Venice – ‘Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable’. Knowing little about the artist and virtually nothing about the exhibition beforehand made it easy for me to think I had stepped through the looking glass into Alice in Wonderland!Hermaphrodite Damien Hirst

 

 

 

 

Hirst had on display 189 sunken treasures retrieved off the seabed of the Indian Ocean, together with collections of flints, ingots and remnants of artefacts. The treasures were supposedly part of the hoard of the Apistos, a ship of a freed slave turned art collector, that apparently sank back in the first or second century AD and was rediscovered in 2008.

Mixed reactions from the art world described the exhibition as ‘An Unbelievable Journey to the Depths of Bling‘, ‘One Man’s Trash is Damien Hirst’s Treasure’ , as ‘once you’re in the joke it grows stale very quickly’! I think I cruised the entire time in awe,  believing every word and stunned at every work presented. It was fabulous!

Just getting past the gigantic 18m+ Demon with a Bowl in the courtyard of Palazzo Grassi was a feat, and at each of the 3 floors of exhibits above he could be admired from every angle. Absolutely incredible, convincingly bronze, yet only painted resin, and assembled in stages as I found out later. From the Demon I became engrossed in the videos where a team of scuba divers worked hard to strap up the treasures found on the sea bed bringing them to safety above…..from the most delicate ancient jewellery to the monstrous sun disc and calendar stone together with Mickey Mouse and Goofy covered in barnacles and seaweed! What’s going on??

In fact the exhibition presents like an archaeological museum with various collections of coins, rare jewellery, precious minerals, weapons, and helmets alongside ‘recovered’ treasures, ‘restored’ treasures and ‘copies’ of treasures……

Bust of the collector Damien Hirstand the Collector himself, Damien Hirst.

The sheer scale of the exhibits and relative authenticity, especially at the Punta della Dogana, continued to impress, even if I was I being taken for a ride, or on a journey in a time machine. Whatever, I was enjoying the unexpected, the audacity, the joke.  As my friend said “you may not like the Art work but whatever it is it must be done well” and these treasures were certainly done well.The Diver

 

 

 

Hirst Warrior and the Bear

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the legend goes ‘the slave accumulated an immense fortune on the acquisition of his freedom. Bloated with excess wealth, he proceeded to build a lavish collection of artefacts…..commissions, copies, fakes, purchases and plunder, which lay submerged for some two thousand years.’Calendar stone and Warrior and the Bear

Damien Hirst when asked is it Myth or Fact replied “whatever you choose to believe!”

 

Still stunned by what we had seen we left the exhibition, passed through the ‘looking glass’ out to the real wonders of Venice…..Venice Punto della Dogana

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No bones about it – Florence exhibition

View of FlorenceThe Humans of 2015 are now just a skeleton this year in the ‘Ytalia’ Art Exhibition at Forte di Belvedere, Florence! No bones about it Florence never fails to surprise me!

As I wandered up to the Fort  I thought of the other exhibitions that had fired my passion or uninspired me, yet I always return to this fantastic location and never Spritual Guard jan Fabreget tired of the fabulous panorama.

Last year’s Jan Fabre Spiritual Guards’ had an overdose of beetles and crosses for my taste. Although I did like the gold turtle in the main square of Florence. While the Zhang Huan‘s exhibition of Buddhas ‘Soul and Matter’ had been a startling reopening to the fortress in 2013.

This year we are treated to polystyrene fiberglass bones covered in gypsum which precariously sway in the breeze and for safety and security reasons have to be tied down!

The Ytalia exhibition – presented 100 Contemporary Italian works of Art about Energy, Thoughts and Beauty to demonstrate, as the pamphlet blurb read: “how Italian Art has strongly influenced the international artistic community and has been a model to admire the perfect balance between classicism and anticlassicality, eclecticism and purism, invention and citation, immanence and transcendence.” 

Forte Belvedere entranceI have my doubts that the exhibition lived up to its promise but it was still well worth the visit.Art Exhibit Florence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lots of beautiful marble alongside rusty iron and the geometric nature of the exhibits  lures the eye into labyrinths and techno prints reflecting Fibonacci’s sequence.

A splash of colour inside the building seems totally unconnected….

and other weird to the absurd exhibits leave me pretty flat!

Skeleton Florence

 

I am constantly drawn back to the panorama of Brunelleschi’s dome seen between oscillating bleached ribs and lassoed toes, or about to be blow-dried…..

 

Art Exhibit Florence

 

And the typical Tuscan view of cypress trees, olive groves and a stray castle tower at the back of the fortress, while stumbling through marble blocks much to the disdain of the Fort custodian!

So just in case you are in Florence, there is still time to see the  ‘Ytalia’ exhibition as it remains open until the 1st Oct and there are more exhibits dotted about town – the Basilica of Santa Croce, Palazzo Vecchio and Palazzo Pitti.  I would suggest Forte Belvedere any year you may be over for the view, the relaxing alfresco wine and café bar and the cheap entrance fee!

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The Old and New of Milan

Milan Navigli canalA weekend in Milan, exploring the new and enjoying the old as we stayed in  the area of the canals – Navigli. I think it’s the only place to stay as it has a layback feel to it, a residential atmosphere that kicks on into party time of an evening as the canals are lined with bars and cafes. But the noise can be shut out as most of the apartments hide inside courtyards locked behind mega doors.

In the quiet of the morning we explored the old laundry area alongside the Opposite the old laundrygrand canal. The florist offered an amazing insight into the side street and its past of laundry workers who resided in the area and worked non stop on providing services to the well to do of Milan.

Laundress

She also specialized in Kokedama– often called poor man’s bonsai. A ball made of wet Akadama soil and Keto (peat). The plant is set into the ball and afterwards the moss is wrapped around it.  Aluminium wire or nylon wire fixes the whole bundle, and it is sometimes used to suspend the Kokedama in the air. She had all sorts of plants in kokedama – orchids, ferns to succulents. As well as a lovely selection of handmade soaps with delicate perfumes.

The old laundry

 

The old laundry exposed the ancient stone slabs used to beat the washing clean under the shade of the roof.

In the same street, hidden courtyards with artist studios and handmade products.

In contrast the curves and fluid lines of the new skyscraper area of Milan around Piazza Gae Aulenti, viewed from the ground was pretty remarkable…..

from above, on the 39th floor of the Lombard Regional office, quite awesome!

More enticing sinuous lines in the Mudec cultural museum together with a beautiful exhibition of Kandinsky.

God Save the Food restaurantFollowed by a great lunch in a trendy, very vegie restaurant, jovially called “God Save the Food” where the beetroot humus and wok vegies were delicious! Served up by a very friendly Tuscan waiter who was homesick, and tired of the frenetic pace of Milan. In fact the constant noise from traffic, Metro and general buzz is not something I would ever get used to.Navigli Grand Canal Milan

 

Still while our real reason for the visit to Milan was something quite different – an Enrique Iglesias concert not to be missed – discovering the old and new of Milan during the day was just as enjoyable.

 

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Spring fever in beautiful Pienza

View of PienzaAs Pablo Neruda said “You can cut all the flowers but you cannot keep Spring from coming”. I have just spent a few days at my artist friend in Pienza bathed in glorious Spring weather and fields of wild tulips and cherry blossoms. The gently rolling hills of Tuscany can not get any better than this area of Val D’Orcia and I am always pleased to be back.

The area has UNESCO World Heritage status: as it is an exceptional reflection of the way the landscape was re-written in Renaissance times to reflect the ideals of good Val d'Orciagovernance and to create an aesthetically pleasing pictures. The landscape of the Val d’Orcia was celebrated by painters from the Siennese School, which flourished during the Renaissance. Images of the Val d’Orcia, and particularly depictions of landscapes where people are depicted as living in harmony with nature, have come to be seen as icons of the Renaissance and have profoundly influenced the development of landscape thinking.

PienzaThat sense of harmony prevails and I could spend hours along the walls of Pienza absorbing these views in the changing sunlight. Or, as we did, take a stroll to the ancient Church of Corsignano with its decorative monsters above the doorway from the 12th Century, although parts of the church date back even to the 7th Century!

Complete harmony in nature. Pienza too is an absolute delight with its elegant Renaissance square and harmonious buildings, as Pope Pius Piccolomini had the money and power to transform his birthplace (Corsignano) into a Utopian dream city.

But that’s not all as the strong scent of the local food speciality, namely the pecorino cheese, wafts along the street and the delicatessens display other tempting delicacies like pici pasta, dry porcini mushrooms, salamis, local honey and extra virgin olive oil.

The quaintness of the place continues with unique shops selling exquisite linen ware, and the kitchenware shop is full of copper pots and pans, basket ware, handmade knives and unusual olive oil servers.

My artist friend Enrico Paolucci is hard at work on a special ‘owl’ commissioned for a birthday surprise so I am left to wander the studio taking photos of his new work ( a homage to his father, Aleardo) and make the most of his hospitality.

After work, dinner in a quiet spot in Pienza and a late night stroll to catch the magic of the moment. Pienza never loses its charm nor the Val d’Orcia, Tuscany, its harmony with Nature.

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Nothing like the Santo Spirito church

Brunelleschi ranted and raved as he led us personally to the Altar in the Santo Spirito church in Florence – just one of the personalities we were to meet from the itinerant Theatre group – La Compagnia delle Seggiole. This genius who had designed the Dome on the Cathedral of Florence some years earlier, was grumbling about how his plans for this church had been modified after his death. He vent his frustration on his local patrons who had not permitted the destruction of the dwellings facing the Arno river, as he had rather boldly designed the church to face the river! While he had begun designs for the project around 1428, work did not commence until 1444 and since he died 2 years after he never saw the completion…..at least not until his return this evening!Santa Spirito church Florence

Monna Giovanna  (the voce of the local people) swept past and told him to stop grumbling as she recounted life in the area amidst  the wool workers and dyers.

I love storytellers and this theatre group has taken me through many monumental buildings in Florence and historical events like the dreadful flood in 1966.

The church is in Oltrano – the opposite side of the Arno river a less touristy area with the most beautiful plain façade (again not how Brunelleschi had planned). The Renaissance elegance so evident inside, and a rather lay back tree lined piazza outside created to eliminate the squalor that surrounded the church in the past. Even today it still has a hangover from its seedy past of drug dealing and alcoholics, replaced now by American students and hip bars and hangouts.

In1980 Mario Mariotti projected hundreds of outlandish slides on the façade, a ‘happening‘ considered advanced for its time and certainly Florentines remained impressed by the display. They were still talking about it in 1985 when I arrived and took me to a café in the piazza where oodles of photos of the slides almost completely covered the walls.

This evening instead was a step into the minds of the great artists of the time. A young Michelangelo appeared praising his recently departed patron Lorenzo the Magnificent for having left him under the protection of the Convent of Santo Spirito. Here he could deepen his studies of anatomy by studying the corpses from the hospital and in thanks he carved the crucifix for the church, at the tender age of 18.

 

Florence Santa Spirito church

An entertaining experience as we wandered through the Cloisters of the Dead, accompanied by Giuliano da Sangallo, the architect of the octagonal Sacristy  which houses Michelangelo’s crucifix. A stop to admire the frescoes of the refectory and later welcomed into the Vestibule by an Augustinian monk with more stories to tell.Frescoe in Refectory

 

 

 

Then it was time to say goodnight to our illustrious  company and Monna Giovanna was quick to remind us that she will be taking us through the Museum of the Innocents as “Una Donna Innocente” next month!Theatre performers

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I did it my Wei and Never Sorry

Florence Palazzo StrozziSome of you may think the title is about me but it is actually taken from Ai Wei Wei’s film called ‘Never Sorry’!

The Wei Wei exhibition ‘Libero’ (Freedom) is in Florence now until the 22 Jan 2017 and I was keen to go early having seen his exhibition in Melbourne in Jan 2016.  There has been quite a lot of comments and some hefty criticisms as the orange rubber dinghies used by refugees, were hung around the majestic Palazzo Strozzi housing the exhibition.

The ‘Huffington Post’  was huffing heaps in an article by Luca Rossi published 5 days before the opening, to give you an idea with an excerpt since the article was in Italian:

‘Ai Weiwei has not done anything politically significant, if not taken advantage of the misfortunes and injustices of the world to increase his fame and the price of his works. Showing the rafts on the facade of the Palazzo Strozzi shows us the refugee problem? As if I did not know that there is a problem, as if the problem did not pass every day on the news. What can an artist do? A lot, but Ai Weiwei does nothing.

If he was born in Viterbo, and  was not “exotic” to the Western world he would not have had the exposure of which he and his gallery owners can enjoy; it is a new form of colonialism, aimed at creating expensive trinkets for the rich to show in some apartment in New York and London. And here are the remains of an earthquake in China in an exhibition in London, and here are the rafts and life jackets hanging of refugees in the city of Berlin and soon (now) in Florence. I would like to see one of those rafts in a living room of Park Avenue.’

wei wei solar cookers

Solar cookers on a wing to freedom

I don’t have the same impression, and believe artworks exist to provoke thought and reflection and as a result, can mean a range of things to different people, and Ai Wei Wei’s exhibits are definitely thought provoking. Many Florentines have never heard of him before so it is a great opportunity for them to discover his works as well as encourage others and tourists from all Italy to visit the exhibition.

 

The impact of the Sichuan earthquake of 2008 which killed roughly 70,000 people is still present with his ‘Snake Bag’ exhibit of 360 kids backpacks sewn together alongside coffins, in memory of over 5,000 children crushed beneath school buildings. In the film ‘Never Sorry’ the list of children’s names, gathered by Wei Wei’s volunteers is papered on the wall of his studio and on the anniversary of this tragic event the public are invited to read a name out loud, continuing the condemnation of the inadequate building materials and structure.

While his career took off after his bird nest stadium for the Chinese Olympics in 2004, Wei Wei has since regretted the building and snubbed the Olympics as being purely party propaganda. Fellow Chinese artists consider him different from those who normally graduate from the Art Academy as he persists with a ‘slap in the face’ style that continues to irritate the Chinese government. His love of his own culture yet his need to break from tradition and conceive images and projects of social significance have set him apart.

wei wei Renaissance men

 

His use of Lego continues in his series on political dissidents, curiously I think taken from Renaissance Italy.

The delicate bamboo and silk figures from Chinese culture – the Birdman, Flying Fish and the Great Wind inspired by kites from his childhood adorn another room.

ai wei wei selfies

Wei Wei selfies

The film shows a very personal side – as a great foodie (which shows!), his love of cats, (keeping around 40 cats and dogs at his studio), his playful side as a father, his organisation of craftsmen, artists and volunteers involved in his projects,  and his constant filming. All gave me a clearer picture of where this artist is coming from.

Free speech puzzle

Free speech puzzle

 

His brand of liberal thinking and use of social media will continue to raise criticisms both inside and out of China and while Wei Wei may be more insecure than what he appears he sure knows what he wants to say with his Art. Wei wei leg gun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Changing Faces of David

Black David statueA black statue of Michelangelo’s David lay in the main square in Florence, as in mourning, “a symbol of the pain and suffering of mankind today. A world that is prey to blind hatred and madness.” The Mayor of Florence dedicated the statue to the victims of Nice as while the life size replica of David had been planned months earlier its unveiling during the Michelangelo week coincided with the tragic terror attack in Nice.

It would be one of the rare occasions that tourists could lie in the arms of David, a rather odd pose for such a famous work of art, created yet again by the skilled workers from the Carrara marble area.Black David statue

It brought to mind the many faces of David that we are exposed to, apart from the obvious masterpiece in the Accademia.

In the panoramic square overlooking the city – Piazzale Michelangelo, an elegant bronze copy of David adorns the square keeping a watchful eye on the city and the hoards of tourists at his feet.

I must add that one of my historian guides did suggest that she considered the copy a poor one as she felt David had a ‘floppy’ bottom….which I leave you to judge for yourselves!

Florence CathedralThe original David was commissioned to demonstrate the virtues of a good government, forever victorious against the enemy, represented by the biblical figure of David who killed Goliath with a stone from his slingshot. Many of you may not know that it was originally to be placed on a side chapel of the Cathedral hence the slightly oversized head and hands to cater for viewing from below. However on seeing the finished statue it was agreed that it was too beautiful to be placed so high up and better placed in front of the Palazzo Vecchio ( the Town Hall) as the defender of civil liberties and a warning against intruders.

It was only moved to the Accademia in 1874 after being damaged more than once in the public square, and it remains there today continuing to awe its viewers.

Curiously David was carved from a block of marble previously abandoned by another sculptor who considered it of poor quality, while Leonardo da Vinci contested Michelangelo for use of the same block. Legend has it when the Minister Soderini who had ordered the purchase came to inspect it, he criticised the big nose, so Michelangelo pretended to chisel away at the nose letting some marble dust fall to keep the Minister happy. Other more modern criticisms I have heard from many unabashed tourist who asks – Why do these sculptures always have small penises? “…small penises were more culturally valued… large penises were associated with very specific characteristics: foolishness, lust and ugliness ” For those interested in the full article click here.

And so this magnificent sculpture, probably the most famous in the world is also used and abused:

In an anti junk food campaign – Mivchelangelo's David

before and after Big Macs!

Or in trashy souvenirs –

aprons, magnets, statuettes

that abound in Florence,

and not so trashy magnets, that animate my fridge!

Still Michelangelo’s David survives it all and in his serene beauty remains the most spectacular sculpture in history and we are forever blessed with his presence here in Florence.

Davide Michelangelo


 

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Walking on water- Christo!

Christo Floating piers

Christo’s Floating Piers had to be seen to be believed and we were not to be put off by the thousands of visitors which increased steadily until the last days. Besides it was our chance to ‘walk on water’ and the experience was not to be missed!

 

 

Christo had invaded Lake Iseo, Northern Italy with a rather unusual project – 90,000 Floating Piers Christo sketchsquare meters of yellow fabric sewn into panels and stretched across 220,000 polyethylene cubes covered with a 70,000sqm of felt to form a Floating Pier. A 3km walkway from the mainland to the large Island of Monte Isola, across and around the tiny (privately owned)  Island  of San Paolo and another 2.5 kms of fabric lining the streets in the villages of Peschiera Maraglio and Sulzano.

The experience was fantastic! Walking across the enormous expanse of silky gold, the gentle rocking beneath our bare feet, the rhythmic undulating rolling of the waves massaging the pier and us into a magic sunset.

 

Floating PiersThe Art Installation was literally taken by assault as soon as it opened on June 18th averaging around 75,000 visitors in a day, and the enthusiasm did not wane despite the blazing heat and the queues and general chaos to get there. On a reassuring note 120 lifesavers and 150 assistants monitored the walkway, although with the record crowds they were a mere drop in the ocean….or should I say Lake!?

However there were no tragic incidents and the crowds enjoyed strolling across the floating pier, and those fortunate enough like us sat and bathed in the sunset over the Lake.Floating Piers

Christo decided that the installation should open during the period in the year when there were more daylight hours, to maximize the light effects on the fabric: “On the lake the humidity is constant and the colour of the fabric reacts and changes constantly. It is red in the morning and goes to yellow and gold in the day. ”  So true.

The Floating Piers has cost $15 million and was financed by the artist through the sale of his works. As all installations of Christo and Jeanne-Claude it was temporary and is being dismantled today and the materials to be recycled.

Weird as it may seem it was a great event, an amazing experience and a delight to be softly rolling with the vibes of Lake Iseo!.Christo Floating Piers

Christo wrao Sydney coastine

I had vague memories of Christo‘s previous works – wrapping buildings and a very early one wrapping the Sydney coastline in the late 1960’s! His famous work wrapping the Riechstag in Berlin, together with many other awe inspiring projects, details of which were on display in the Museum of Santa Giulia in nearby Brescia.

For more about Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s bio, works, up-to-date exhibition listings, check out Artsy’s Christo and Jeanne-Claude page

 


 

 

 

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