Time for the snow- Little Alps and Dolomites

Snow shoesAfter such a long hot Summer in Italy the predictions were for a freezing Winter of the likes of 1985, which was the freeze of the Century; pipes broken, olive trees burnt and snow on the ground for a month, even in Florence! I was dreading the thought since I had decided to stay home this Winter.

So far the predictions have proved false apart from this weeks polar temperatures ( -8 degrees) and snow for a couple of days at home, we have had only minor snow falls in the mountains.In snow shoes Still it was my opportunity to test my skills in snow shoes on Monte Falco and Monte Falterona near the Tuscan, Emilia Romagna border at a height of 1564m. A fabulous experience, since I am not a skier, or snow border and rarely set foot on the snow. An Italian friend said he could understand that since I am Australian!? As if to say there is no snow in Australia!??

After an explanation on how to put on the snow shoes and their various variations for uphill and downhill – blocks and heels, we set off. A cold but sunny day with magic images of fairy tale trees dripping in icicles, shadow contrasts in untouched snow throughout the forest and a breathtaking view at the summit. High enough to see as far as the Northern Alps. Unbelievable!

Especially since I was to be in the Dolomites shortly after, at 2000m hiking amongst skiers and snow borders, enjoying even more breathtaking views, spectacular scenery and idyllic weather. The home to Otzi the Iceman  the 53000 year old mummy, found in the glacier in 1991!

Home base was at Merano, above Bolzano in the South Tyrol area, close to the Austrian border. German, or should I say Southern Tyrol dialect spoken, and hardly a word of Italian overheard. A pretty village of art nouveau buildings, Tyrolese traditional dress and famous Sacher chocolate cake. And constant references to the Austrian Empress, affectionally known as Sissi, who spent her vacations at  Trauttmansdorff Castle.


We headed for the Merano 2000  cable car to the summit, together with hoards of local and tourist skiers sounding like a herd of elephants with their heavy snow boots. It’s a family ski resort with over 40kms of slopes for all ages and levels of competence as well as a great trail for hikers, intermittently crossing the ski slopes without too much risk.

Incredibly beautiful, wherever you looked, and as hikers it’s easy to have the time to take in the views at leisure.

Apple Orchards Venosta valleyThe next day we were in for another treat on the ice and snow of Lake Resia in the Venosta Valley, land of our apple orchards. Infinite rows of trees line the valley and the slopes, leaders in the production of organic apples for both the Italian and European market.

It’s the biggest lake in the area, in reality an artificial reservoir created in theBell tower immersed in Lake Resia 1950’s flooding the towns of Curon and Resia so only the steeple remains uncannily visible above the water level. An historic landmark surrounded by romantic legends of its bells still being heard in the depths of the water. An area sort after by ski surfers and windsurfers in season as it blows an outright gale through the valley.

We walked the Lake into the sun with the icy wind at our backs, past the jetty laden with ice and packed snow that serves as the boat tie up in the warmer months. Onto San Valentina alla Muta submerged in metres of snow, a picture postcard.

While I am not totally converted to a snow experience, as I still hate the cold, I have to say it was a beautiful experience and better than I had expected. Now I understand why people go!

My moment of relax on the Dolomites and a farewell to the steeple on Lake Resia

Lake Resia steepleMoment of relax in the Dolomites






Trentino Alto Adige map



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