Oddspots Italian Style

The Old and New of Milan

Milan Navigli canalA weekend in Milan, exploring the new and enjoying the old as we stayed in  the area of the canals – Navigli. I think it’s the only place to stay as it has a layback feel to it, a residential atmosphere that kicks on into party time of an evening as the canals are lined with bars and cafes. But the noise can be shut out as most of the apartments hide inside courtyards locked behind mega doors.

In the quiet of the morning we explored the old laundry area alongside the Opposite the old laundrygrand canal. The florist offered an amazing insight into the side street and its past of laundry workers who resided in the area and worked non stop on providing services to the well to do of Milan.

Laundress

She also specialized in Kokedama– often called poor man’s bonsai. A ball made of wet Akadama soil and Keto (peat). The plant is set into the ball and afterwards the moss is wrapped around it.  Aluminium wire or nylon wire fixes the whole bundle, and it is sometimes used to suspend the Kokedama in the air. She had all sorts of plants in kokedama – orchids, ferns to succulents. As well as a lovely selection of handmade soaps with delicate perfumes.

The old laundry

 

The old laundry exposed the ancient stone slabs used to beat the washing clean under the shade of the roof.

In the same street, hidden courtyards with artist studios and handmade products.

In contrast the curves and fluid lines of the new skyscraper area of Milan around Piazza Gae Aulenti, viewed from the ground was pretty remarkable…..

from above, on the 39th floor of the Lombard Regional office, quite awesome!

More enticing sinuous lines in the Mudec cultural museum together with a beautiful exhibition of Kandinsky.

God Save the Food restaurantFollowed by a great lunch in a trendy, very vegie restaurant, jovially called “God Save the Food” where the beetroot humus and wok vegies were delicious! Served up by a very friendly Tuscan waiter who was homesick, and tired of the frenetic pace of Milan. In fact the constant noise from traffic, Metro and general buzz is not something I would ever get used to.Navigli Grand Canal Milan

 

Still while our real reason for the visit to Milan was something quite different – an Enrique Iglesias concert not to be missed – discovering the old and new of Milan during the day was just as enjoyable.

 

Oddspots Italian Style

Nothing beats a Moka pot

Moka coffee pot

My new Moka pot for one

In a moment of distraction, I burnt out my Moka coffee pot….Oh No!!!

The handle literally melted off the side and while the rest was still intact, it was definitely time to buy a new one. No replacement base would do as it would ruin the coffee flavour since it had gurgled out of water for far too long. So as I popped down to the shop to get my new one, I thought how Italian I have become!

My Moka pot has been my coffee maker at home ever since I arrived in Italy and it is definitely my favourite coffee machine. No new fangle dangle devices can compete, not even a flashy George Clooney Nespresso model….unless it comes with George!?!

While the rest of the world, and a large part of the Italian world, has embraced coffee machines so they can enjoy an espresso or cappuccino at home, quite a few of us have clung to our Moka. Why?

It makes a great espresso, or added to hot milk a wonderful breakfast caffé latte. Comes in various sizes from, just for one, for 3, 6, 9 and a mega 12 person Moka which I have only seen in the Bialetti shop. Takes 5 mins to make on a gas or electric stove, and for the most part the Moka is indestructible, with easy to find replacement parts like filters, and gaskets etc.

Moka Bialetti 1940's cartoon

Bialetti’s 1940’s cartoon on how to use a Moka

Bialetti would have to be biggest brand, and in fact is the inventor, which in the Italian post-war depression was a great convenience for all people who could no longer afford to go out. Renato Bialetti is the  moustached cartoon figure that appears on their logo.

 

There is still an Art in the Making’, as in everything Italians do.

Fill the base with water to just below the heat valve, heap the coffee in the funnel just a touch, squeeze tight and place on a low flame not bigger than the pot and turn it off just as it starts to gurgle. If sharing the larger pots it’s best to give a quick stir in the top so the coffee consistency is uniform for everyone. Use only warm water, NO SOAP, to clean it and it will serve you forever.

Florentine Moka pot

Just about everyone now has a modern coffee machine, which I found out the hard way when I went to my friends wedding in Finland. I took, what I thought to be, the perfect gift: a Florentine (Brunelleschi style dome top) Moka pot with trendy illy coffee cups. I was very happy with myself until I walked into their home and was offered a cappuccino from their coffee maker!

In fact at the Milan Expo on food in 2015 I discovered that the Finns are the highest consumers of coffee, followed by Germans, Brazilians with Italians only rating fourth! Although that should come as no surprise since I think Italians do most things in moderation and think they own the coffee legend.

And while I do love a cappuccino and a good espresso, I save that desire to when I am out at the bar or restaurant as something of a special treat. Now that’s Italian!

I have already seasoned my new little Moka pot, working it through 3 coffee rounds before taking a first sip. Ahhh, just lovely! I will treat it with due respect and continue to enjoy this fabulous Italian invention and great tradition.

My Moka pots

My Moka pots for 1, 3 and 6

And if Italy is in your next travel plans, check out my post on Italian Coffee etiquette so you too can feel like a local when you get here!


 

 

Oddspots Italian Style

Rum and chocolate in exotic Cuba

Drinking Rum

Leaving Havana to explore the rest of Cuba, starts with a good shot of rum at our first stop! The Forbidden Fruit  tourists seek, along with cigars, is produced from sugar cane introduced in Cuba by Columbus. And while the sugar cane production is now heavily reduced there is still sufficient to produce the famous Cuban Rumrum!

We did manage to crunch on some cane to savour the succulent juice in the Valley of Los Ingenios ( near Trinidad) and see the ruins of the sugar mills, slave quarters and watchtowers now an area with Unesco Heritage status.

 

Bailing dry riceOn the way, rather caught by surprise to see bales of rice lining the road ready for loading, the rice having spent the day spread out along the road for drying. The mind boggles to think of how the traffic manoeuvres in one lane….they must drive like Italians!! Let alone the flavour the asphalt may give to the rice!?

From Havana, our first stop was the Bay of Pigs – Playa Girón, and the museum dedicated to the disastrous invasion by USA of Cuba. An interesting video of the invasion from the Cuban point of view and other artefacts associated with the Revolution – the uniform of the volunteers teaching illiterate farmers, and the white shoes – symbol of what the Revolution brought to a teenager, whose mother was shot dead while protecting her during invasion.

Playa Girón Cuba

 

After that, a moment of relax, swimming at the nearby waterhole and in crystal clear water at the coral beach.

Cienfuegos - Palacio de Valle

 

 

Cienfuegos our next stop, a colonial town with neo classical architecture and wide avenues where we were treated to a cocktail on the roof terrace of the rather bizarre Palacio de Valle, an ornate Spanish, Moroccan, Italian mix.

 

Che Guevara museum - Santa Clara

On to Santa Clara the next day, to be immersed in the dramatic story of  Che Guevara in his Memorial and Mausoleum. Documents, photos and various memorabilia makes it a fascinating visit but unfortunately no photos allowed inside.

 

 

The next base is Trinidad, the most touristic of the cities outside of Havana and with good reason. A perfectly preserved Spanish settlement built on the wealth amassed in the past from the nearby sugar cane fields. Colonial mansions and cobbled stone streets lined with multi coloured houses. Salsa music every evening on the steps beside the Cathedral and traditional African dance performances. A Cuba -Trinidad Cowbay Cubanoteworthy Art gallery in the main square and  women in garish lycra chat in the streets or saunter past more classic car beauties or stray cowboys.

Waterfall Trinidad

A local hike to the waterfall in lush countryside provides a welcome break from the tourists on another day.

Camaguey instead had a much more local feel and a sweet grandma ran my homestay. Known as the city of clay pots for water collection and easily visited in bicycle rickshaws to see more colonial mansions,  artist galleries and the local market with food stalls and herbal medicines. Yet again Nightclubs and salsa venues for locals and tourists to add pizazz to their evenings.

Dancing Santiago

 

On to the chaos of Santiago the second largest city in Cuba and our home stays bounce to the blaring street music that only ceased with the electricity black out! And if you can’t beat’em it’s best to join in! Fidel's tomb - Santiago

 

 

 

A more sombre moment in front of Fidel’s tomb.

 

 

 

Travelling on through beautiful lush terrain and velvet mountains, bring us to the chocolate capital of Cuba – Baracoa, for our last few relaxing days. We can still see the damage left by the hurricane of November, with skinned Royal palms sprouting new growth and some roofs still to be replaced.

The atmosphere is layback, as is the music, and the place is exotic in both artwork and people.

Our cacao plantation visit is a highlight as we pile into another classic car ( a little less chic than those of Havana) with an erotic gear stick change that had to be photographed to be believed and a mad driver who has us laughing all the way!

The cacao plantation is a women’s cooperative and they are proud to explain the plant and process to produce some mouth watering chocolate that we are able to sample, oddly wrapped in leftover alfoil from the pharmaceutical company!

Baracoa beachThere is so much to tell about Cuba, a simple blog post cannot do it justice. 17 days of continuous stimulation and enjoyment, I loved it!

My head is still full of the music, the colour, the warmth, the vibrant atmosphere and fond memories of great laughs with wonderful travel companions.Cuba map

For those interested, I found the tour via www.responsibletravel.com  which linked to www.locallysourcedcuba.com and am very happy with both agencies.

Beach Trinidad

Cuba just do it….before it’s too late!

Oddspots Italian Style

Music, colour and classic cars – Havana Cuba

Havana street

Cuba – vibrant, colourful, exotic, brash and unabashed, a fantastic trip of the expected and unexpected, full of laughs and a joy to the senses!

The biggest difficulty has been sorting my 900 photos and to present a selection which renders a complete picture of Cuba: its warmth, humanity, starkness and contrasts.

So this is only part 1 on Havana and part 2 will focus on touring the island.

 

Classic cars from pre Revolution days abound on the avenues, filled with Classic car tourtourists waving and filming like VIP’s, or sit patiently waiting the next client in a quiet elegance. Exteriors and interiors are exquisite; hand stitching on sumptuous leather, some complete with a bar, and gleaming bodies in brash colours. Gorgeous, even to a non car enthusiast like me, and the drive a definite highlight of our tour. To think they have continued to maintain, restore and repair these old carcasses, despite the embargo, demonstrates Cuban ingenuity, resourcefulness and patience.

Havana Malecon - waterfront We soar past beautiful buildings from colonial days, elegant monuments to heroes of the past in stylish piazzas, luscious parks, fortresses that protected the city and housed the gold, before cruising the Malecon – waterfront.

In the old centre, an afro/salsa beat draws me along streets and past characters in colourful garb who pose or waylay tourists for a fee.

The air is full of energy and the place chaotic, where locals continue their lives amidst tourists squatting at a wifi hot spot or queuing for a bank, while they shop on the street, queue outside the pharmacy or pick up their monthly ration quota.

Havana street scene

In stark contrast to the elegant Colonial buildings, everyday housing is dilapidated although our various Case particolares – homestays, were comfortable, clean and gave a little insight into what lay beyond the crumbling facades.

Havana University

Amidst the chaos is the impressive University building, with a mix of old and new architecture and likewise the Contemporary Cuban Art Gallery housing a sophisticated selection of superb art works, rather unexpected. The Cuban Classical  ballet Company entertained us with a performance of The Nutcracker in the glorious Grand Theatre and we left spellbound by the atmosphere and costumes.

A testimony to the investment made in Health, Education and Culture during the Revolution, on which the country continues to survive by exporting its scientific expertise to Latin America and Africa. Over 30,000 Doctors in Venezuela still today.

Havana souvenir shopTourism obviously remains the second major income for Cuba with over 3million tourists per year and cruise ships were seen regularly in various ports. And while many have the idea Cuba will change in the post Castro era, so best to be seen now, my impression is that it will take years! So you still have plenty of time yet!Havana street art

 

 

The music will still be playing, the facades still crumbling and the classic cars still cruising. There may be more Coco taxi HavanaCoco taxis to take tourists around town, a cute recycled coconut chassis with a motorbike motor and 3 wheels as tourists seek cheaper options, while locals use the bicycle rickshaw.

I continue to savour memories of my coconut ice and churrito snack as I lapped up the sunshine  before returning home to below zero temperatures in Italy.

Part 2 Cuba on tour to follow……


 

 

Oddspots Italian Style

Merry Xmas and Happy New Year!

Xmas FirenzeIt’s that time of year again, and the days seem to disappear in a rush.

There is just a smidge of snow on the mountains near home, not really enough for Santa and Rudolf to sleigh down on, but I think he arrives via a smartphone App these days! And while I have seen a few letters to Santa publicized I think the rest are probably emailing or whatsapping! How the world changes. We are also hoping Santa may have solution in his sack to our current government crisis….??

Yet Florence still has its reassuring traditions – the Nativity Scene is back beside thenativity scene Florence Duomo along with the Xmas tree and Xmas lights adorn most of the streets in the centre giving the place that special magic.

The wonderful panettone and pandoro cakes have been in the supermarkets  now for ages – which makes me wonder how much preservatives must be in them? But I succumb every year and my pandoro star will get it’s good shake of icing sugar and a little warming in the oven when my first Xmas guests drop by.

And the faithful guardians of our city keep a watchful vigil on us all.

So I thank you all for reading my posts and am open to any suggestions you may have or things you may be curious about in Italy but didn’t know who to ask. Ask me via the comments box or email anytime.

Gourmet cooking school and foostoreFor any Melbourne readers I add a little plug for my niece’s Gourmet kitchen cooking school. If you’re stuck for a gift idea she has lots of interesting kits, gourmet delicatessen items, Xmas hampers with a difference, recipe books and gift vouchers for doing a cooking class on all sorts of wonderful foods – Thai, Spanish, Pasta making, Japanese etc and currently helping many make delicious macaroons for Xmas. Check the website here or drop by at 20 Margaret St, opposite Moonee Ponds Station.

I hope this year has been a good year for you all and wish you a Very Merry Xmas and a Happy, Serene and Healthy 2017!

I am off to Cuba in January for a few weeks so will leave you with just a taste of what the atmosphere may be like in the video below…….you never get too old to dance!!!

Gente di Zona with Marc Anthony – La Gozadera

 

 

Oddspots Italian Style

Electronic Innovators get it together – Makers Faire Rome

water purifier

Water Purifier

High tech ‘Makers’ and ‘Innovators’ have me captivated, and for my third year in a row I toured the five pavilions at the Makers Faire in Rome . Why you may ask?  Because it’s an opportunity to see new developments and understand how vast this land of Inventors is and the potential of the new technology. It’s astounding!

At risk of being repetitive I say for creativity Italians have it hands down, and the place was swarming with young, passionate, enthusiasts and smart designers eager to explain their new idea and keen to find support for funding the project, often via crowd funding. The Makers movement incorporates the idea of sharing knowledge, creating new, tinkering with the old and recycling to avoid waste, using the new technology at its best.

I headed directly to the ‘Life’ pavilion filled with new projects, particularly aimed at disabled. Too Wheels bowled me over – a wheelchair designed in a FAbLab inTurin with recycled bike wheels, pipes, plywood and instruction manual on how to DIY or buy the package…..accessible to anyone in the world!

 

The young Talking Hands designers won the first prize of €100,000 at the Fair which  hopefully will get the project developed. A technological glove, that on the hands of a deaf person can translate sign language into voice to enable communication with people like us. The guys can be proud of themselves.

Noon talk phone

Or the Noon Care Talk project that allows our smartphone to communicate to our loved ones, who may not be super technological, on a simple Talk phone: sending reminders of pills to be taken AND confirmation, Dr’s appointments etc, with GPS location, direct contact and emergency call button so you always feel in touch.

Then there were various alternative energy projects for lighting using a plastic water bottle, solar energy powering old kerosene lamps (liter of light) to slick wind turbines.

ono 3D printer smartphone

Objects printed by Ono

A rush on the Smartphone 3D Printer- Ono….Oh No!!! and various other devices for cleaning and sterilising smartphone screens.

3D printer smartphone

 

 

 

clean hero

smatphone wiper

 

 

 

 

 

Not exactly essential in life and curious to see the presentation of the wiper being done by a robot!?

 

 

An unusual selection of new machines like the multidimensional electrical bike, 3D printed monuments that can show the weather, and lightweight sculptures reproduced by 3D scanning to create a mobile museum of important artworks.

 

And a superb array of artisan work  in furnishings – Wally 3D printed lamp

cardboard stools and chipboard furniture

fashion design like the coffee bags by girls from Bologna – Re-Find  of interlaced polylaminate coffee bean packaging

and digital fabrication and much more…….

I love it all; the creativity that sees no boundaries, the clever presentation, the smart use of lingo, the enthusiasm, the educational aspects, the philosophy behind it and the thousands of visitors of all ages looking on in awe at what can be made. Wow!ifixit T shirt

So if this has inspired you, you may need to update your toolkit and I highly recommend ifixit.com On my next order I need this Tshirt!

After all, I fixed my washing machine, brought my iPhone back to life after it finished in the washing machine and installed my new car radio….so I consider myself part of the Makers movement!

 

Oddspots Italian Style

20 Years of Mantua literature festival

Mantua Piazza SordelliIt was my 2nd year at the Mantua Literature Festival and the Festival’s 20th year Celebration. An onslaught of ideas and reflections on world issues and individual journeys in a fabulous Renaissance setting. Record Summer temperatures continued and the ancient buildings and garden locations provided welcome relief as brains ticked over at each presentation.

Carlo Petrini founder of Slow Food is convinced food is not just about calories but a Carlo Petrini, Pavan Sukhdevcultural activity that binds us together, involving billions of workers, creating climate change and affecting our biodiversity. He discussed this with economist Pavan Sukhdev who believes our Economic model needs to be broader to include human, natural and social capital not solely financial and to identify the links between immigration, climate change and terrorism.

howard jacobson, jeanete winterson

A panel of English writers – Jeanette Winterson, Howard Jacobson with Hay Festival organiser Peter Florence debated the English ‘malaise’ of Brexit with that touch of English humour  that made the argument seem less tragic than it is.

Francesco de Gregori

 

And our Italian Bob Dylan – singer songwriter Francesco de Gregori reflected on life’s journey, the characters behind the lyrics and his storytelling that continues to touch our hearts today. It was a delight to shake his hand and exchange a few words as he wrote my book dedication.

And there was more: an eclectic mix from – The life of Bees, the dangers of Internet data, a black Milanese comedy, the importance of bloggers for political resistance and social change, to e-italian and the speed language changes with technology. Bouncing from one queue to another and juggling the frustrations of coinciding events was challenging although it was not all work and no play!mantua clowns

flat-shoes

The city is delightful, as I had discovered last year, unique and captivating, glorious piazzas framed with fluted palaces and street porticoes shading elegant shops. A bikers paradise and a high heel nightmare of cobblestones!

mantua literature festival volunteers

 

Little kids splashed paint on wolf stencils after listening engrossed to the fable while the blue T shirted bigger kids were the team of  volunteers essential to the smooth organisation of the Festival.

Workshop areas were in tune with the ecological issues espoused – recycled cardboard benches and very cute egg cartons offered comfy seating in the book sharing area.

 

The local speciality of ‘sbrisolona’ cake was everywhere and hard to refuse when it was Mantua Hemingway cafeoffered in bite size takeaway cones – essential sugar for the brain as there was no time to doze off. A quick make-up refresh was on hand and the dog could get his fix just across the way. Book readings in the park, a special immigration info point with all the latest updates, and a mix of movies even one retracing Hemingway’s steps in Sardinia.

All inspiring and stimulating!

And as the sun set on each day, it was time to drift to a new location for a well deserved spritz before dinner exchanging workshop details with friends before parting ways again to the evening presentation. Newly dedicated books underarms, and another queue that offered new conversations with strangers who were keen to share their experiences.

Mantua nightlife A surprise  Tango lesson at our restaurant on the last night and we were ready to say goodbye to this magic city of Mantua…..until next year!Mantua doorknocker

 

Oddspots Italian Style

Out of the woodwork – Back on tour!

Rome Piazza Navona

Rome- Piazza Navona

I have been enticed out of retirement and will be back on tour in April 2017….oh my!?!     But not on my own fortunately, as it has been Angus Stewart, the ABC garden expert, who has lured me out of the woodwork to be his Tour manager on a proposed Garden tour around Rome and Southern Italy.  The tour leaves Australia on the 17th April and returns the 5th May, 2017.

Wow, I’m already excited!

Map Garden tour

 

As the tour brochure blurb reads:The Amalfi Coast is an area of coast line a couple of hundred kilometres south of Rome. The largest city is Naples (Napoli) whose landscape is dominated by the famous volcano, Mt Vesuvius, and of course Pompeii is a ‘must see’ attraction nearby. For gardeners the area to the south of Naples is the real attraction, with smaller towns such as Sorrento, being the places to spend your long lunches around visits to landmark gardens.

There are a couple of ‘must see’ gardens that showcase perfectly the borrowed landscape of the plunging cliffs and slopes that border the spectacular sea views. We visit Villa Cimbrone, the picturesque village of Ravello, the volcanic island Ischia filled with beautiful villas and gardens and home to a botanically themed garden called La Mortella. This tour offers a rich and inspiring window into the art of Mediterranean gardening……..

Angus Stewart is a professional horticulturist and plantsman. He has turned his lifetime Taormina gardensof horticultural experiences to good use to lead tours to some of the great gardens of the world. Angus is perhaps best known for his work as a gardening presenter on the ABC, both with Gardening Australia for the last 11 years, and on ABC 702 radio station in Sydney where he has been answering gardening talkback questions for around 25 years.” 

 

As you can imagine it’s not just a tour about gardens, but an immersion into the culture and specialities of Southern Italy’s cosmopolitan melting pot in fabulous Spring weather. To tempt you – the over-the-top stunning baroque of Ortigia-Syracuse, Sicily

Taormina

Taormina theatre

 

 

And fabulous Taormina – Sicily, with spectacular views, staying in the magnificent San Domenico Palace hotel a 13th century ex monastery! Not to be missed!

 

For the itinerary and cost click here on Opulent Journeys

So it will be “Buongiorno Possums” all over again, without of course stealing Angus’s thunder and sunshine as Tour leader!

Sorrento

View of Sorrento

 

I’m looking forward to the tour despite having been so many times to the Amalfi coast and Sicily as there will be new gardens for me to see as well as some old time favourites like La Mortella and Ninfa gardens.

 

 

 

Come join us and don’t forget to tell Opulent Journeys you are clients of mine!             For info and bookings contact Tony Phone: 1300 219 885                                         Email: tony@opulentjourneys.com.au

Positano

Positano – Amalfi Coast


 

Oddspots Italian Style

Walking on water- Christo!

Christo Floating piers

Christo’s Floating Piers had to be seen to be believed and we were not to be put off by the thousands of visitors which increased steadily until the last days. Besides it was our chance to ‘walk on water’ and the experience was not to be missed!

 

 

Christo had invaded Lake Iseo, Northern Italy with a rather unusual project – 90,000 Floating Piers Christo sketchsquare meters of yellow fabric sewn into panels and stretched across 220,000 polyethylene cubes covered with a 70,000sqm of felt to form a Floating Pier. A 3km walkway from the mainland to the large Island of Monte Isola, across and around the tiny (privately owned)  Island  of San Paolo and another 2.5 kms of fabric lining the streets in the villages of Peschiera Maraglio and Sulzano.

The experience was fantastic! Walking across the enormous expanse of silky gold, the gentle rocking beneath our bare feet, the rhythmic undulating rolling of the waves massaging the pier and us into a magic sunset.

 

Floating PiersThe Art Installation was literally taken by assault as soon as it opened on June 18th averaging around 75,000 visitors in a day, and the enthusiasm did not wane despite the blazing heat and the queues and general chaos to get there. On a reassuring note 120 lifesavers and 150 assistants monitored the walkway, although with the record crowds they were a mere drop in the ocean….or should I say Lake!?

However there were no tragic incidents and the crowds enjoyed strolling across the floating pier, and those fortunate enough like us sat and bathed in the sunset over the Lake.Floating Piers

Christo decided that the installation should open during the period in the year when there were more daylight hours, to maximize the light effects on the fabric: “On the lake the humidity is constant and the colour of the fabric reacts and changes constantly. It is red in the morning and goes to yellow and gold in the day. ”  So true.

The Floating Piers has cost $15 million and was financed by the artist through the sale of his works. As all installations of Christo and Jeanne-Claude it was temporary and is being dismantled today and the materials to be recycled.

Weird as it may seem it was a great event, an amazing experience and a delight to be softly rolling with the vibes of Lake Iseo!.Christo Floating Piers

Christo wrao Sydney coastine

I had vague memories of Christo‘s previous works – wrapping buildings and a very early one wrapping the Sydney coastline in the late 1960’s! His famous work wrapping the Riechstag in Berlin, together with many other awe inspiring projects, details of which were on display in the Museum of Santa Giulia in nearby Brescia.

For more about Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s bio, works, up-to-date exhibition listings, check out Artsy’s Christo and Jeanne-Claude page

 


 

 

 

Oddspots Italian Style

Seville – Flamenco, Tapas, Bullfighting and exotic architecture

Seville - Presidency of Andalusia Who could go past an invite to Seville – Spain, even if only for a few days…and to surprise a lifelong friend by my visit! My head was filled with the click of castanets, pulsating clapping and the swish of a matadors cape to the cries of Olé Olé! In my bag the ‘Ten best things to see in Seville’ to read on the plane as it had been a rather last minute decision. And what a magnificent place it was! Grandiose and gracious, spacious yet still intriguing, colourful and intoxicating.

The sound of church bells, carts and horses crossing the piazza and chatter of locals brought us down to the Cathedral  square in time to catch the beginnings of one of the most important festivals in Seville – El Rocio pilgrimage

Gypsy style wagons and oxen decorated with flowers and bells circled the piazza, while handsome horse riders stood in readiness to lead off as women flaunted copious frills and garish flowers in their sleeked hair. And this was only Day 1!

Seville CathedralJust to see the glorious Cathedral is awe inspiring for its size as it is the largest Gothic Cathedral in the world. A legend says that when the plans were drawn up, church elders stated: ‘Let us build a church so beautiful and so magnificent that those who see it finished will think we are mad.’ A true reminder of Seville’s, power and wealth after the Reconquista – the fall of Islam.

A climb up the 39 ramps to the top of the Giralda bell towers was well worth it…..just breathtaking!

Seville bullring entrance

Tempted as I was to see a bullfight I didn’t go but strolled past the oldest bullring in Spain, which dates back to 1758 with 14,000 arena seats.Matador statue

 

 

 

 

 

Friends had organized tickets to a much more emotional performance of  traditional flamenco instead.

 

A wander through the exotic Alcazar Royal Palace felt like a flashback on my Iran experience. Centuries of Moorish decorations in a complex of Palaces with delicate arches and courtyards set in exquisite gardens.Alcazar Maiden's courtyardSeville Royal Palace

 

 

 

 

Plaza EspanaSeville is an easy city to stroll around, everything so close at hand which makes it hard to get lost. We head to the lovely gardens near the University and into the spectacular Plaza de Espana – Impressive buildings created for a world Fair in 1929 that almost left the country bankrupt and which today provides a fabulous fun park to navigate on the moat or laze about and soak up the sun.Seville Plaza EspanaPlaza Espana decorations

 

 

 

 

Seville Metropol Parasol

Metropole Parasol

 

 

 

Yet Seville is not only historical architecture, the futuristic Metropol Parasol in the midst of the old city, is a stark contrast to one of our favourite Tapas bars nearby.

 

Seville Tapas bar

Tapas bar

Seville street corner

 

 

 

 

 

Tea and Spice shop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And as we wander the Old Jewish quarter of Barrio Santa Cruz by spice shops and artisan boutiques some kids push past in a rush to get to their ‘fiesta’.

Seville local children

 

Future flamenco dancers for sure!

 

 

 

 

 

Golden tower

 

 

A wander along the river past the Golden tower in search of a good spot to enjoy a sangria and the sunset on our last day in this great city Seville – Spain.

 

 

Seville at dusk